Terms Used to Describe Derivative Works

sketchesofpayne

Listening to Hatsune Miku since 2007
Jan 21, 2021
81
www.youtube.com
Classifications of Derivative Works

I've wanted to figure out the terms for different types and styles of derivative works. If you take an original song and change elements of it, what term best describes those changes? I made this table from my best estimation of what those terms would be. I'd like to know if others agree or disagree with some of them.

O = Original N = New

Vocal Track Music TrackLyricsMelody
O
O
O
O
Remaster
N
O
O
O
Cover
O
N
O
O/N
Remix
O
O
N
O
Translation
N
N
O
N
Remake
N
O
N
O
Reinterpretation
N
N
O
O
Rendition
N
N
N
O
Adaptation

I know you can just slap a "cover" or "remix" label on it and call it good. But then honestly what's the point of discussion and why do these other terms even exist? Sometimes it's worth looking at the words we use and what they really mean. Use the meaning and connotation of words like a scalpel instead of a fire axe.
 

Katastrophe

Not An Actual Phoenix
Apr 8, 2018
71
I've seen people use "dub" more when it comes to voiced secondary works instead of "translation", which is used more for text-only works.

This is pretty interesting though. :0 I haven't seen the term "rendition" used much in this context, I think most people would call it a remake rather than a rendition. I'm trying to think of an actual example of a "remake" as defined by this chart but I'm coming up blank. Seeing the term "reinterpretation" is making me nostalgic though, for those old Vocaloid song reinterpretations such as Cantarella Freedom and Mirishira Romeo and Cinderella.
 

sketchesofpayne

Listening to Hatsune Miku since 2007
Jan 21, 2021
81
www.youtube.com
Looking at it, perhaps "remake" isn't the right term. What comes to mind for me is those cover versions of a song that change the genre, meter, and timbre so much that they're nearly unrecognizable.

If you look in the dictionary, one of the definitions of "rendition" is: an interpretive performance of a piece of music.

Yes, it's so cool seeing what the Vocaloid community can do by modifying material and adding their own touch to it.
 
I've seen people use "dub" more when it comes to voiced secondary works instead of "translation", which is used more for text-only works.
A term nowadays by Utaites is "translyrics" (lyrics translated into another language that match the melody). So you would write "English Translyrics" for a song being translated to/sung in English.

I think "English version" works with conveying what it is, too.

But in reality, people who translate lyrics for their job actually just call it "song translation(s)".
 
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